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Mar 2022

CELEBRATING EARTH HOURS AT OUR HOUSES

The world is always changing.

And while most of those changes – innovative leaps, cultural breakthroughs, artistic feats – are cause for celebration, climate change calls for action. This month, we’re taking part in Earth Hour across our Houses, Yvan Deng shares the story behind his work – now on view at The Opposite House – and Jing’s Head Bartender William tells us a simple DIY cocktail recipe for your home bar.

LIGHTS OUT FOR EARTH HOUR

Part of our journey towards sustainability at The House Collective is a dedication to raising awareness to climate change and nature loss. On March 26, our Houses will be marking Earth Hour by turning off the lights, illuminating with candlelight and relaxing with a singing bowl healing session.
 

    

THE STORY BEHIND THE ART

Last month, The Opposite House unveiled its latest public installation, artist Yvan Deng’s ceramic series “Infinite & Inconceivable Lust”. We chatted with Yvan about the inspiration behind his work, bringing the East together with the West and his multimedia approach.

 What inspired you to create this piece?

 

“The inspiration for this work came from my personal life experience. I want to open a conversation for the future about caring – without labelling it. The idea of using the elements of Chinese traditional crafts while creating a sculptural canvas that attempts to bring the East and West together.” 

 

 

 What inspired you to create this piece?

 

“The inspiration for this work came from my personal life experience. I want to open a conversation for the future about caring – without labelling it. The idea of using the elements of Chinese traditional crafts while creating a sculptural canvas that attempts to bring the East and West together.” 

 

 

What are the differences between “Infinite & Inconceivable Lust” from the other art pieces you’ve created? 

 

“Since prehistoric times humans have been creating art in various forms and mediums. Nowadays most of people think art is only a canvas or sculpture, but as I’ve always said, there is only art and it comes in many forms. Over the years things shift; technology and tools have evolved. So I try to express myself on a new canvas or new sculptural forms. I want to use different mediums – painting, sculpture, lighting and architecture – through which I can tell a story. The difference in this piece from previous works is how I’ve created a new canvas while using several mediums alongside a distinct configuration of sculptural ceramics. The intention is to create something visually sharp that brings nostalgia and can appeal to our senses with a story. I think this is a new format for the audience – it was specifically created for this statement. All the pieces I develop are in distinct formats and materials. I can create in silk or ceramic but the intention is that I try to bring Chinese elements into the contemporary scene.” 

What is your favourite space at The Opposite House? 

 

“My favourite space at The Opposite House is the pool where the lights and colour of the space make you release any tension.” 

 

What is your favourite space at The Opposite House? 

 

“My favourite space at The Opposite House is the pool where the lights and colour of the space make you release any tension.” 

 

One word to describe your experience with us 

“Home.” 

 

What are the upcoming and exciting projects we should be looking forward to? 

“I have a few exhibits coming in Shanghai and in Mexico. But let’s focus on today because nothing is more important than what is happening now.” 


One word to describe your experience with us 

“Home.” 

 

What are the upcoming and exciting projects we should be looking forward to? 

“I have a few exhibits coming in Shanghai and in Mexico. But let’s focus on today because nothing is more important than what is happening now.” 


CIN CIN! AT HOME

We are pleased to present a unique pop-up bar at the outdoor area of Jing at The Temple House, featuring a one-of-a-kind mezcal cocktail experience in collaboration with Mestizo and Pao from Friday, 11 March 2022 until the end of April, daily from 5pm to 1am.

The three brands will be joining hands in Chengdu for the first time to bring together China-inspired flavours and premium craft spirits, taking cocktail lovers on a journey through a creative modern drinking experience to discover why mezcal has been celebrated for centuries.

AN ARTFUL JOURNEY

Art is our passion. It’s at the heart of our Houses. Adorning our walls and interiors, hand-picked art pieces infuse our spaces with creativity and craftsmanship. The Middle House’s collection is themed “I Dream of China” in a showcase of local Chinese and international artists that reflects the artistic crossroad that is Shanghai. Each a part of the porcelain narrative drawn from the historic town of Jingdezhen in Jiangxi province, every piece tells its own story for viewers to interpret.

 

Caroline Cheng’s stunning White Porcelain Robe greets you in the lobby, a subtle and familiar nod to the robe sculptures at The Opposite House in Beijing. With studios in Shanghai and Jingdezhen, the Hong Kong-born artist has painstakingly sewn on hundreds of handcrafted ceramic butterflies in a show of incredible craftsmanship.

Caroline Cheng’s stunning White Porcelain Robe greets you in the lobby, a subtle and familiar nod to the robe sculptures at The Opposite House in Beijing. With studios in Shanghai and Jingdezhen, the Hong Kong-born artist has painstakingly sewn on hundreds of handcrafted ceramic butterflies in a show of incredible craftsmanship.

Nearby, you’ll also find Works on Paper with Joss Stick Perforations by Chinese-Australian artist Lindy Lee. Loosely inspired by traditional porcelain painting patterns and drawing her Chinese heritage, these contemporary textural works speak volumes about modern Chinese art.

 
Nearby, you’ll also find Works on Paper with Joss Stick Perforations by Chinese-Australian artist Lindy Lee. Loosely inspired by traditional porcelain painting patterns and drawing her Chinese heritage, these contemporary textural works speak volumes about modern Chinese art.

 
Shanghainese artist Liu Dao, who works with local art collective Island 6, is also represented. At the lift lobby, his Vases in a Steel Cage challenges you with its juxtaposition of delicate porcelain vases caught within a harsh metal frame.
 
Shanghainese artist Liu Dao, who works with local art collective Island 6, is also represented. At the lift lobby, his Vases in a Steel Cage challenges you with its juxtaposition of delicate porcelain vases caught within a harsh metal frame.
 
Upstairs at the bar, renowned English ceramicist Felicity Aylieff’s three-metre high Giant Ceramic Vase takes the limelight. Collaborating with artisans in Jingdezhen, she combines contemporary design with traditional skills where the origin of the world’s porcelain trade began thousands of years ago.
Upstairs at the bar, renowned English ceramicist Felicity Aylieff’s three-metre high Giant Ceramic Vase takes the limelight. Collaborating with artisans in Jingdezhen, she combines contemporary design with traditional skills where the origin of the world’s porcelain trade began thousands of years ago.
Australian painter Dean Home’s oil painting in Sui Tang Li takes on a Chinese subject in its portrayal of traditional ceramics, but with a distinctively Western style. The painting’s vibrant and rich colour palette stands in contrast to the neutral, sophisticated tones throughout the rest of the hotel, setting an undeniable tone for the restaurant that’s at once playful and sumptuous.
 
Australian painter Dean Home’s oil painting in Sui Tang Li takes on a Chinese subject in its portrayal of traditional ceramics, but with a distinctively Western style. The painting’s vibrant and rich colour palette stands in contrast to the neutral, sophisticated tones throughout the rest of the hotel, setting an undeniable tone for the restaurant that’s at once playful and sumptuous.
 

LIGHTS OUT FOR EARTH HOUR

Part of our journey towards sustainability at The House Collective is a dedication to raising awareness to climate change and nature loss. On March 26, our Houses will be marking Earth Hour by turning off the lights, illuminating with candlelight and relaxing with a singing bowl healing session.
 

    

THE STORY BEHIND THE ART

Last month, The Opposite House unveiled its latest public installation, artist Yvan Deng’s ceramic series “Infinite & Inconceivable Lust”. We chatted with Yvan about the inspiration behind his work, bringing the East together with the West and his multimedia approach.

 What inspired you to create this piece?

 

“The inspiration for this work came from my personal life experience. I want to open a conversation for the future about caring – without labelling it. The idea of using the elements of Chinese traditional crafts while creating a sculptural canvas that attempts to bring the East and West together.” 

 

 

 What inspired you to create this piece?

 

“The inspiration for this work came from my personal life experience. I want to open a conversation for the future about caring – without labelling it. The idea of using the elements of Chinese traditional crafts while creating a sculptural canvas that attempts to bring the East and West together.” 

 

 

What are the differences between “Infinite & Inconceivable Lust” from the other art pieces you’ve created? 

 

“Since prehistoric times humans have been creating art in various forms and mediums. Nowadays most of people think art is only a canvas or sculpture, but as I’ve always said, there is only art and it comes in many forms. Over the years things shift; technology and tools have evolved. So I try to express myself on a new canvas or new sculptural forms. I want to use different mediums – painting, sculpture, lighting and architecture – through which I can tell a story. The difference in this piece from previous works is how I’ve created a new canvas while using several mediums alongside a distinct configuration of sculptural ceramics. The intention is to create something visually sharp that brings nostalgia and can appeal to our senses with a story. I think this is a new format for the audience – it was specifically created for this statement. All the pieces I develop are in distinct formats and materials. I can create in silk or ceramic but the intention is that I try to bring Chinese elements into the contemporary scene.” 

What is your favourite space at The Opposite House? 

 

“My favourite space at The Opposite House is the pool where the lights and colour of the space make you release any tension.” 

 

What is your favourite space at The Opposite House? 

 

“My favourite space at The Opposite House is the pool where the lights and colour of the space make you release any tension.” 

 

One word to describe your experience with us 

“Home.” 

 

What are the upcoming and exciting projects we should be looking forward to? 

“I have a few exhibits coming in Shanghai and in Mexico. But let’s focus on today because nothing is more important than what is happening now.” 


One word to describe your experience with us 

“Home.” 

 

What are the upcoming and exciting projects we should be looking forward to? 

“I have a few exhibits coming in Shanghai and in Mexico. But let’s focus on today because nothing is more important than what is happening now.” 


CIN CIN! AT HOME

We are pleased to present a unique pop-up bar at the outdoor area of Jing at The Temple House, featuring a one-of-a-kind mezcal cocktail experience in collaboration with Mestizo and Pao from Friday, 11 March 2022 until the end of April, daily from 5pm to 1am.

The three brands will be joining hands in Chengdu for the first time to bring together China-inspired flavours and premium craft spirits, taking cocktail lovers on a journey through a creative modern drinking experience to discover why mezcal has been celebrated for centuries.

AN ARTFUL JOURNEY

Art is our passion. It’s at the heart of our Houses. Adorning our walls and interiors, hand-picked art pieces infuse our spaces with creativity and craftsmanship. The Middle House’s collection is themed “I Dream of China” in a showcase of local Chinese and international artists that reflects the artistic crossroad that is Shanghai. Each a part of the porcelain narrative drawn from the historic town of Jingdezhen in Jiangxi province, every piece tells its own story for viewers to interpret.

 

Caroline Cheng’s stunning White Porcelain Robe greets you in the lobby, a subtle and familiar nod to the robe sculptures at The Opposite House in Beijing. With studios in Shanghai and Jingdezhen, the Hong Kong-born artist has painstakingly sewn on hundreds of handcrafted ceramic butterflies in a show of incredible craftsmanship.

Caroline Cheng’s stunning White Porcelain Robe greets you in the lobby, a subtle and familiar nod to the robe sculptures at The Opposite House in Beijing. With studios in Shanghai and Jingdezhen, the Hong Kong-born artist has painstakingly sewn on hundreds of handcrafted ceramic butterflies in a show of incredible craftsmanship.

Nearby, you’ll also find Works on Paper with Joss Stick Perforations by Chinese-Australian artist Lindy Lee. Loosely inspired by traditional porcelain painting patterns and drawing her Chinese heritage, these contemporary textural works speak volumes about modern Chinese art.

 
Nearby, you’ll also find Works on Paper with Joss Stick Perforations by Chinese-Australian artist Lindy Lee. Loosely inspired by traditional porcelain painting patterns and drawing her Chinese heritage, these contemporary textural works speak volumes about modern Chinese art.

 
Shanghainese artist Liu Dao, who works with local art collective Island 6, is also represented. At the lift lobby, his Vases in a Steel Cage challenges you with its juxtaposition of delicate porcelain vases caught within a harsh metal frame.
 
Shanghainese artist Liu Dao, who works with local art collective Island 6, is also represented. At the lift lobby, his Vases in a Steel Cage challenges you with its juxtaposition of delicate porcelain vases caught within a harsh metal frame.
 
Upstairs at the bar, renowned English ceramicist Felicity Aylieff’s three-metre high Giant Ceramic Vase takes the limelight. Collaborating with artisans in Jingdezhen, she combines contemporary design with traditional skills where the origin of the world’s porcelain trade began thousands of years ago.
Upstairs at the bar, renowned English ceramicist Felicity Aylieff’s three-metre high Giant Ceramic Vase takes the limelight. Collaborating with artisans in Jingdezhen, she combines contemporary design with traditional skills where the origin of the world’s porcelain trade began thousands of years ago.
Australian painter Dean Home’s oil painting in Sui Tang Li takes on a Chinese subject in its portrayal of traditional ceramics, but with a distinctively Western style. The painting’s vibrant and rich colour palette stands in contrast to the neutral, sophisticated tones throughout the rest of the hotel, setting an undeniable tone for the restaurant that’s at once playful and sumptuous.
 
Australian painter Dean Home’s oil painting in Sui Tang Li takes on a Chinese subject in its portrayal of traditional ceramics, but with a distinctively Western style. The painting’s vibrant and rich colour palette stands in contrast to the neutral, sophisticated tones throughout the rest of the hotel, setting an undeniable tone for the restaurant that’s at once playful and sumptuous.
 
01
LIGHTS OUT FOR EARTH HOUR
02
THE STORY BEHIND THE ART
03
CIN CIN! AT HOME
04
AN ARTFUL JOURNEY
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